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The Knit Signal

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Knitters, I need your help! I’ve recently been working on finishing up my Sideways Shawls Ebook, and the much-delayed Counterpane Shawls Ebook, and I’d love to have a few of you “test drive” the worksheets and patterns and let me know what you think.

I’m looking for up to 6 test knitters for each ebook. Please leave a comment letting me know which ebook you’re interested in testing & I’ll be in touch! Here’s an overview of what’s in each…

Counterpane Shawls Ebook


Mitre-Square Shawl (matching my current reading!)


Moiré Square


Bright Star Square


Hydrangea Square

Sideways Shawls Ebook


Rosarian Shawl


Trigonometrician Shawl

Details

Deadline: 10 June 2013!!

Counterpane Shawls: You can either just test the counterpane squares, OR knit your own counterpane shawl using the worksheet OR knit the mitre square shawl. Again, I would mostly like feedback to make sure the technique is clear, so any mods are welcome.
If you’d like to knit the mitre-square shawl as given, you’ll need: 550m / 601yds of light-DK-weight yarn. Variegated or self-striping will work well. I used Creative Yarns Reflections, but it’s now discontinued, which is some indication of how long it’s taken me to publish this design!

Sideways Shawls: You can either choose your own stitch pattern, or use one of the included stitch patterns. If you choose to knit the patterns as given, the pink shawl requires: 480m / 525yds of 4ply-weight yarn. I used the Ice Yarns Pure Alpaca I hauled here.
And the grey shawl requires: 750m / 820yds of DK-weight yarn. I used Nako Süper Saf Yün.
I just need some general feedback to make sure the worksheets work as intended, so by all means, make any modifications you please.

Photos would be nice, but aren’t necessary. I know the deadline is a bit tight, but I’d really like to get these out by my birthday (20 June). I may be dreaming, but it’s my birthday & I’ll try if I want to! :)

More Shawl Ebooks

I thought it would be nice to unite my shawl ebooks by designing matching covers for all of them. These are some very rough first drafts to see how they would look together. Do you like them, or do you prefer ebook covers to have photos?

As I think I mentioned before, Fill-in-the-Blanks Shawl Design II will be all about shawls knit in the round. Are there any other shawl shapes you think I should write worksheets for? I can’t think of any more at present, but I really enjoy coming up with the worksheets, so I’d love any suggestions!

Also, I’ve had many knitters ask me whether it’s OK to sell / knit-to-sell shawl patterns they’ve created using my Shawl Ebooks. The answer is: nothing would delight me more! If you currently have such a pattern for sale, please comment with the link, and I will create a list on the relevant ebook pages.

Finally, a big THANK YOU to everyone who has left me kind and thoughtful comments during my unplanned absence. I LOVE YOU ALL; YOU MAKE MY DAY / MONTH / YEAR! Thank you, thank you! ♥ ♥ ♥

25th May, 2013  // Laylock // tags: , .

Knitting on Paper

knitting paper

KNITTING PAPER – PDF

I’m a bit embarrassed to admit that one of my new year’s resolutions for the past TWO years has been to knit a Fair Isle slipover, possibly with matching socks or legwarmers (& a jumper for Teddy?) and I haven’t even come close to designing one. The trouble is that there are so many wonderful possibilities! Where to begin?


More Fair Isle inspiration on Pinterest.

Online Knitting ClassDo I want colours of similar hues, or do I want to mix them up? What about keeping the background colour constant throughout? I do know that I’d like to combine modern patterns with the traditional ones, and I’d quite like each design to have some sort of symbolic meaning, even if I’m the only one who knows about it.

With so much to keep in mind, I thought it would be better to start small, and use this knitting paper I designed to doodle Fair Isle patterns I liked, when I came across them. Mary Mucklestone’s amazing 200 Fair Isle Motifs (more on that later) gave me a head start on patterns, and when I have time I’ll be working through her Fair Isle course on Craftsy. Of course I could do the job in iWork, but it wouldn’t be half as much fun, would it? You all know how much I enjoy colouring in! :)

knitting paper

Once I have the patterns I like, I can cut them out in strips and play with the positioning until I’m happy with the way they look together. I may need to find some more coloured pencils though… ;)

knitting paper

KNITTING PAPER – PDF

The PDF includes both large and small versions of the stitch paper, in both orientations. I hope you find it useful! :)

12th February, 2013  // Downloads, Prtinables // tags: , , .

Pompon Scarf

pompon scarf

Pompon! I don’t know which makes me happier, the sound of the word or the tactile pleasure I derive from the object itself. Don’t they resemble coconut balls from a distance?

pompon scarf

Inspiration


Image credits: one, two & three.

I’ve been doing a lot of stash-busting lately, partly to make room for my Ice Yarn hauls (of which I have another to document), and when I saw this adorable pompon scarf from Anthropologie, it seemed like the perfect solution to some cream acrylic I had left over from my novice knitting days.

pompon winding

I made a template with outer circle diameter 11cm, and hole diameter 5.5cm, and began winding. I was quite happy with my floppy pompons, until my Mum decided to have a go…

pompon scarf

On the left is her perfect pompon, and on the right is one of mine. >_>

She wound hers so tight that it took a lot of effort to cut through, and my poor template looked quite battered afterwards, but she did create a pompon that all other pompons can aspire to, and that only needed some light trimming. Mine all needed shearing! Never mind, the offcuts will be good for stuffing.

pompon scarf

I made 10 pompons in total and used about 400g of aran-weight acrylic yarn. In my opinion, this is definitely a project for cheap yarn, even if you wear it around your neck.

Suggestions

I don’t think I need to teach any of you how to make a pompon, but I do have a few suggestions:

  • Use a surgeon’s knot when tying your pompon up. It’s just like a regular knot, but you pass the end of the yarn through the loop twice. This keeps the knot from sliding before you make another overhand knot. Useful for bows too!
  • Leave the ends of the yarn you use to tie up long, as this makes it easier when it comes to attaching your pompons together.

Assembly

This is really the trickiest part. Here’s the solution I came up with…

pompon scarf

Thread both ends of the yarn through a large tapestry needle. Align the next pompon so that its strings point up, and poke the needle into the bottom of it, pulling until the loop left is as long as you want the gap between your pompons to be. My idea in using two strands was that the pompons could be tucked through the loops to secure the scarf around my neck, so if the idea appeals to you, you might want to check that you can fit a pompon through the gap you leave.

Once the two strands are poking up out of the top of the next pompon, I tied all four strands two-by-two to each other. Just keep knotting until the pompon is secure and can’t slide up or down. Then repeat the same for all the other pompons.

ta-da!

You can experiment with smaller or larger pompons, different colour combinations (can we see an ombre pompon scarf, please?), and maybe even make use of some child labour. ;)

pompon scarf
pompon scarf
pompon scarf

When not around your neck, pompon scarves make really lovely garlands you’ll want to fondle constantly.

pompon scarf

And did you know you can trim pompons into a heart shape? It’s true! :)

Pom pom pom…

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10th February, 2013  // How To, Style // tags: , , , .
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